sauteed squash blossoms

Before this season, I had never cooked squash blossoms before. I’ve eaten them, but not cooked them. I think the delicate nature of them had me in a kind of awe. They are so pretty, and so dainty that you can almost see through them. But after making these sautéed squash blossoms, I will be buying them each and every time I see them.

I was at my local farmers’ market when I finally jumped in and bought these beauties. There were so many containers of these gorgeous yellow-orange flowers. They were stacked up in a big floral mountain. It was like a country meadow. They were calling me name.

It’s such a short season for these blossoms, that I recommend that if you see them, you buy them. Don’t make the mistake I made of waiting. And waiting. And waiting. Ugh… so much lost time…

Oh, and the lovely vendor talked to me a lot about how to cook them.

And all of a sudden, my zucchini/squash blossoms phobia went away.

Squash blossoms (a.k.a. zucchini blossoms) are awesome. And easy to cook. Yup, I can say that now. I think everyone should try them. Often, when you see them on restaurant menus, they are stuffed with cheese. But, when you make them yourself, you can sauté them simply like I did here. This way, you can enjoy them for the healthy, simple, beautiful vegetable that they are. Yes, you just have to make these sautéed squash blossoms. No ifs, ands or buts… it’s a must.

I mixed my sautéed squash blossoms into a big bowl of grain-free pasta the last time I had them. I’ve also spread them out on a cheese-less pizza. OMG… these things are so good!

If you are looking for another easy vegetable dish, try my recipe for Sesame Green Beans.

sauteed squash blossoms

Here’s why these sautéed squash blossoms are good for you:

Squash blossoms (or zucchini blossoms) are high in Vitamin C, calcium and iron. One cup has only 5 calories.

Grass-fed butter is a great source of healthy fat. It contains no carbohydrates, and it can actually help regulate your blood sugar. The nutrients in grass-fed butter are so much higher than those found in butter that comes from the milk of grain-fed cows.

Garlic is amazing in its antiviral and antibacterial capabilities. Garlic is actually a Chinese herb (Da Suan). It’s used to kill toxins and parasites and also to reduce swelling in the body. It’s what I call a great “A” herb: anesthetic, antibacterial, anti fungal, antioxidant, antiviral, etc….

Sea salt contains magnesium, calcium, potassium, zinc, iron, and iodine — all minerals that are necessary for a healthy body. Himalayan sea salt is good for your bones, sleep, libido, muscles, and heart.

sauteed squash blossoms

Sauteed Squash Blossoms
Author: 
Recipe type: vegetables, side dish, simple
Cuisine: vegetarian, seasonal
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 3
 
Squash blossoms are awesome! If you've never had them, buy them now. This recipe takes 5 minutes to prepare... and then you can mix them into pasta or top your pizza with them!
Ingredients
  • 10 - 15 organic squash/zucchini blossoms
  • 1 Tbs grass-fed butter
  • 1 smashed garlic clove
  • sea salt and black pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Gently spread the petals of each blossom, and rinse out each one, making sure no bugs are hidden inside.
  2. Heat the butter in a large saute pan. When it's melted, add the garlic clove and stir it around for about 30 seconds.
  3. Gently place as many blossoms as will fit in a single layer in the pan. After about 10 seconds, flip them over. Only leave them on the second side for about 10 more seconds. Repeat with remaining blossoms.
  4. Stir some sautéed blossoms into a bowl of hot grain-free pasta, or top your pizza with them.
  5. Enjoy!

sauteed squash blossoms

Kitchen-of-Youth

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